Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 2


Home (contents) Chronology Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 2

Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 2

This page follows Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 1.

The images on this page are mostly artistic derivations of contemporary photos. See Copyright of early hang gliding photos.

Art based on a photo by Gene Emory from Stockton, California, of ground to air refuelling at Salt Creek, California
Ground to air refuelling at Salt Creek, California. Photo by Gene Emory from Stockton, California.
Wrangler advert in Glider Rider
Wrangler advert in Glider Rider

Pionerr hang glider pilot Liz Sharp at the American Cup competition in 1979
Comms helmet 1970s style. Pioneer hang glider pilot Liz Sharp at the American Cup competition in 1979.

A colour photo of Liz flying her Condor appears on the next page and there is an external link to an article about her farther down this page.


Paula Vieria flying a Phoenix 6C
Paula Vieria flying a Phoenix 6C. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

Another lady pilot, this time in South America, was Paula Vieria. The Phoenix 6C was another Bennett wing designed by Dick Boone. See also the Dick Boone, hang glider designer and Bill Bennett’s Delta Wing Kites and Gliders related topics menus.

Developments 1978-9

Photo of a 1970s hang glider pilot wearing 'flap chaps'
Reprinted courtesy of Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.
‘Flap chaps’ (see the translucent triangle of fabric stretched between the pilot’s legs) helped you obtain a steeper glide on your final approach to landing. However, they did nothing to correct the cowboy image of hang gliding in the 1970s. Reprinted courtesy of Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.


Tom Peghiny's Eagle
Tom Peghiny’s Eagle photographed at Torrey Pines by Bettina Gray

The Eagle was a prototype that Tom Peghiny made while at at Seagull Aircraft. (See the Seagull Aircraft related topics menu.) The adding of a tail was partly driven by the increasingly popular Soarmaster bolt-on power unit at this time. If you stalled the wing under power, its high thrust line caused a pitch-over, hence the need for greater pitch stability and dive recovery. (See Early powered ultralights part 1 for more about the Soarmaster power unit.) The simple V configuration of the Eagle tail was easier and quicker to rig than a three piece design.

The zero sweep design of the Eagle was similar to that of the Markowski Eagle III (see Scientific American hang glider).

Tom Peghiny's Eagle photographed at Torrey Pines by Bettina Gray
Tom Peghiny’s Eagle of 1978 photographed at Torrey Pines by Bettina Gray

These variations arising from the struggle for greater performance combined with adequate stability and controlability, all without adding too greatly to the cost of manufacture and effort of rigging, did not make it into production. Yet, according to Tom Peghiny, the Jaguar (derived from the Eagle) would make a good motorglider combined with one of today’s paraglider power units.

For the immediate successor of the Eagle, see Jaguar in Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 3. For more of Tom Peghiny, see Flying squad, a short history of the east coast U.S. hang glider manufacturer Sky Sports.

See also the Flex-wings with tails related topics menu.


Hang glider launching
Ultralight Products Mosquito launching

Here, the wind on the sail has taken some of the pilot’s weight: Notice the upward curve of the leading edges, which were straight when the Mosquito was unloaded.


Art based on a photo by Michael Pringle of  Ken DeRussy launching an Ultralight Products Mosquito at Wilcox Beach, Santa Barbara
Ken De Russy launching an Ultralight Products Mosquito at Wilcox Beach, Santa Barbara. Photo by Michael Pringle.

In 2012, long time instructor Ken De Russy sent me several American hang gliding magazines and books pre-dating my own collection. They provided much information I drew on for this web site. See the Santa Barbara Hang Gliding Emporium page for more.


UP Mosquitos at Torrey Pines by Pete Brock
UP Mosquitos at Torrey Pines by Pete Brock. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

The UP Mosquito was unique in its combination of forward-canted king post, triangular tip fins, and heavily bowed leading edges. A British pilot reported that the leading edge tubes were straight, but when launching in light wind, they took up their curved alignment part way through the launch run with an alarming clunk!

For a link to Richard Cobb’s comprehensive UP Mosquito page, see the related topics menu Ultralight Products of California and Utah.


The Mitchell Wing was a tail-less monoplane in which aerodynamic stability is built into the wing (mostly…) as is the case with most flex-wing (Rogallo) hang gliders. Unlike most other rigids of the time, the Mitchell Wing was ‘cantilevered’; its structural strength was built inside the wing rather than relying on external struts and cables.

Art based on a photo by Randy Bergum of Chuck Rhodes flying a Mitchell Wing at Marshall Peak, San Bernardino, California
Chuck Rhodes flying a Mitchell Wing at Marshall Peak, San Bernardino, California. Photo by either Randy Milbrath or Randy Bergum.

George Worthington, a former US Navy pilot, became a world distance record-holder in his fifties and sixties flying a Mitchell Wing as well as flying flex-wing hang gliders in the Owens valley.

See the Mitchell Wing page for more.

Moyes Maxi advert
Moyes Maxi advert in Glider Rider

Moyes Gliders of Australia was among the top manufacturers then, as now (2021) opening a facility in the U.S.A. to meet demand. See also the Moyes related topics menu.

Vehicle-based testing

While sandbag testing of single surface gliders suspended upside-down is effective (refer to the related topics menu Testing for stability and structural strength) there is a particular problem with sandbag testing of double surface sails: You cannot reach the underside of the upper surface to put sandbags on it. Even if you could — and even if there was enough room — how many sandbags should you place on the lower surface to add an ‘upward’ (downward in the Hiway upside-down test) force on the cross-tubes?

That was one impetus behind hang gliding associations in several countries creating structural and pitch stability test rigs. They included the Hang Glider Manufacturers Association in the USA, the DHV in Germany, and the British Hang Gliding Association.

Art based on a photo by Tom Price of hang glider structural testing in 1979
Hang glider structural testing in 1979. Photo by Tom Price.
Hang glider test rig gear of late 1970s
Test rig gear photo by William Pregler reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine

Co-author of Aerodynamic Test System in the March 1981 Glider Rider Thierry Guignard was of Highster Aircraft, manufacturer of a double-surface flex wing similar to the Sky Sports Sirocco, both predating the Comet.

Art based on a photo via Michael Schonherr of the Gutesiegel structural test rig of 1980
The Gutesiegel structural test rig of 1980. Photo via Michael Schonherr.

I don’t know of anyone, inside or outside of the hang gliding industry, who is capable of doing an accurate structural analysis of a flex wing hang glider; the loading situations are far too complex and varied.

— Mike Meier of Wills Wing writing in Hang Gliding, June 1983, to explain why rigorous testing is required

Pitching curves by Gary Valle in Glider Rider magazine
Pitching curves by Gary Valle of Sunbird in Glider Rider. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

See also the Computing in hang gliding related topics menu.

Sail painting

Albia Miller and a painted sail in Glider Rider, February 1979. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.
Albia Miller with a painted Phoenix 12 Jr. sail in Glider Rider, February 1979. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

Compare with the (almost) blank canvass…

Phoenix 12 manual cover
Phoenix 12 manual cover

The Seagull factory was still making gliders with curved leading edges.

Seahawk 2 with Soarmaster power unit. Photo by Robert Turner.
Jim Johns flying a Seahawk 2 with Soarmaster power unit. Photo by Robert Turner. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

The Seagull Seahawk mark 2 had more battens than its predecessor. The artwork on the sail of this example was carried out by Donna Lifsey. See also the related topics menus Hang glider sail art and Seagull Aircraft of Santa Monica, California. See Early powered ultralights part 1 for more about the Soarmaster power unit.

Jim Johns at Jockey's Ridge by J Foster Scott
Jim Johns at Jockey’s Ridge. Photo by J Foster Scott reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

Jim Johns did not need an engine, however. On 18 April 1980, he flew his un-powered hang glider (in free flight as we call it) from 134 foot-high Jockey’s Ridge, North Carolina, 4.5 miles down wind to land near the Wright memorial.


The Seagull Seahawk held a long-standing reputation for its handling qualities throughout launch, flying, and landing.

Jeanne Bauer in a Seagull Seahawk hang glider
Jeanne Bauer in a Seagull Seahawk. Photo by Jack.Newman reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

I will never forget the first time I flew a new one. It had perfect static balance, was lightweight, and with a good run I was off. The glider was in trim: It needed no pilot. With easy predictable control, I was in love even before I had come to a gentle landing.

–Doug Rice, Glider Rider, November 1980

Tim Joseph in a Seagull 11 Meter in the Owens Valley with the White Mountains behind
Tim Joseph in a Seagull 11 Meter in the Owens Valley with the White Mountains behind. Photo by Bill Kelsey reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

Deve Freeman in a Phoenix Super 8 with painted sail. Photo by Eric Simmons.
Deve Freeman in a Phoenix Super 8 with painted sail. Photo by Eric Simmons.

The hang glider name Phoenix was effectively monopolized by Bill Bennett’s Delta Wing Kites and Gliders of Van Nuys, California. Bennett’s designer at this time was Dick Boone. I have no info about who created the sail art in this example. See also the Dick Boone, hang glider designer and Bill Bennett’s Delta Wing Kites and Gliders related topics menus.

Hang glider sail art
Eipper-Formance Flexi 3 sail art

Another painted sail. The pilot is Jeff James, but I do not know who painted the sail or who took the original photo.
Another painted sail

The pilot here is Jeff James and the glider is an AeroStar Starcraft made in Boone, North Carolina. The airframe was made of 1 1/2 049 tubing, making it very light. This is a later version after deflexors were added. (3)

See the Hang glider sail art related topics menu. Also see under External links later on this page for video in color of George Worthington’s Cumulus VB with dragons painted on the sail.

Engineering

Al Alsing, a machinist at Manta, from their advert in Glider Rider, June 1980
Al Alsing, a machinist at Manta, from their advert in Glider Rider, June 1980. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

Manta, based in Oakland, California, manufactured the Fledge 2 ‘semi rigid’ hang glider, which at this time was unbeatable in competition. However, a flex-wing was under development by a rival manufacturer that was to nullify the Fledge’s advantage. The Manta Fledge 2, like the Eipper Quicksilver, subsequently gained a new lease of life as a powered ultralight. (See Early powered ultralights.) Manta also manufactured components for other powered ultralight manufacturers. See the Manta Products of California related topics menu.

Owens Valley pilot by Regina Risolio
Owens Valley pilot by Regina Risolio
Elisabeth Brunet, chief judge at the 1979 world championships
Elisabeth Brunet, chief judge at the 1979 world championships, held in Grenoble, France. Photo by Bettina Gray.
George Worthington, Tom Peghiny, and Dennis Pagen at Chattanooga in October 1978 by Bettina Gray
George Worthington, Tom Peghiny, and Dennis Pagen at Chattanooga in October 1978 by Bettina Gray
Bob Calvert, Derek Evans, and George Worthington
Bob Calvert, Derek Evans, and George Worthington by Bettina Gray. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.

George Worthington was a retired navy pilot who held world distance records in both rigid and flex-wing hang gliders. (See the Mitchell Wing page for more of Worthington.) Tom Peghiny started designing and building his own hang gliders while still at school. Dennis Pagen writes the most authoritative texts about every aspect of hang gliding.

Bob Calvert was the top ranked British pilot at the time. Derek Evans managed the British competition team.


Ultralight Products chair advert. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.
Ultralight Products chair advert. Reprinted courtesy Light Sport and Ultralight Flying magazine.
Art based on a photo by Aerial Techniques of Dennis Pagen on landing approach
Dennis Pagen on landing approach. Photo by Aerial Techniques.

Jeff Burnett at Grandfather Mountain in the Sirocco magazine advert. Photo by Jim Morton.
Jeff Burnett at Grandfather Mountain in the Sirocco II magazine advert. Photo by Jim Morton.

Dennis Pagen, a prolific author of hang gliding technical articles and books, was U.S. champion in 1978 flying a Sky Sports Sirocco II, which he partly designed. For more about this east coast manufacturer, see Flying squad.


Flight Designs Lancer IV advert in Hang Gliding, May 1979
Flight Designs Lancer IV advert in Hang Gliding, May 1979. The original photo was by James Country.

In early 1979, the Lancer IV, originating in New Zealand, epitomized the state of the art for the average flex-wing pilot. (See Marty Alameda and Flight Designs.) However, as was normal in hang glider technology development during this period, its pre-eminence did not last long. A new wing designed in France was about to consign all previous flex-wings to history. Then, a further development in California made that design redundant too, at least among top performing flex-wings.

The Raven

Fly straight with perfection
Find me a new direction

— From the lyrics of The Raven by the Stranglers, 1979

A manufacturer in the USA discovered by accident that their novice level glider without deflexor wires bracing the leading edges outperformed their more advanced wings. (I am not sure whether Electra Flyer of New Mexico with their Dove or Wills Wing of California was first with that discovery.) Realizing that deflexors caused too much drag, hang glider manufacturers then changed to stronger leading edge tubes instead. Wills Wing, just one of the several hang glider manufacturers based in California, replaced their three production hang glider types, the Omega, Omni, and Alpha, by a single defelexorless design; the Raven. (See the related topics menu Sport Kites/Wills Wing of California.)

Art based on a photo by instructor Greg DeWolf of fellow instructor Erik Fair flaring a Wills Wing Raven
Instructor Erik Fair flaring a Wills Wing Raven. Photo by fellow instructor Greg DeWolf.

Notice the absence of deflexors along the leading edges, with their cables, adjusters, supporting struts, and attachment fittings. All gone! In this late model Raven, even the outer ends of the crosstubes and their attachments to the leading edges are tucked away into the slower moving air close to the underside of the sail.

Erik Fair, shown here demonstrating correct landing flare technique in a Wills Wing Raven, wrote an entertaining and instructive book titled Right Stuff for Hang Glider Pilots.

In this image the creases in the left (underside) leading edge pocket, caused by differential span-wise tension between the leading and trailing edges, create an incorrect impression of the camber of the sail, incidentally. The orientation of the batten pockets provides an accurate indication.

Dove

Dove: Past tense of dive 😀

John LaTorre had been instructing and selling and repairing gliders in Maryland, eastern Pennsylvania, and northern Virginia, but the harsh winter of 1977-8 shut down the business for which he worked…

I had just turned thirty, and not only was I jobless, but it fell to me to tell all our customers that there would be no refunds for pre-paid lessons or deposits on gliders.

Fortunately, Electra Flyer of New Mexico was hiring…

Five days later, at around midnight, I pulled into a UPS parking lot on the north side of Albuquerque, drew the curtains, and slept. The next morning, I found the factory and claimed the job.

— John LaTorre (1)

LaTorre was soon in charge of the Electra Flyer sail loft, the begginning of a 15-year stint as a sailmaker, at one point with thirty people working for him in two shifts. He picked up sailmaking techniques from Tom Price and Tom Peghiny, who were working as designers at Electra Flyer. See also the John LaTorre related topics menu.

Hang glider manufacture is intolerant of even apparently trivial changes. Every change must be tested. This sub-section describes a problem with a prototype licence-built Electra Flyer Dove, and its solution.

The Electra Flyer Dove was a beginner rated single-surface wing with the latest 1979 features: Absence of deflexors and the addition of short anti-flutter battens at the tips. All modern hang gliders (in 2020) incorporate the former (that is, they are without deflexors) and some also include short anti-flutter battens.

Electra Flyer Dove hang glider of 1979
Electra Flyer Dove

The first prototype of the Scotkites/Eurowing license-built Dove (with UK aluminium tubes and a sail made in the U.S.A.) flew just like American made Doves; at least in light winds. However, when two test pilots tried it in stronger conditions, they found that pulling on speed caused the nose to drop alarmingly. It was puzzling because the new frame was a good match for the original.

Some ‘wind tunnel’ testing on top of the hill in a strong breeze illustrated that a slightly loose fit of the sail at the nose and the flexibility of the plastic center batten caused the problem. When the angle of attack was reduced enough, the sail at the nose blew down, radically altering the airfoil curve and introducing a nose-down pitch force. (The nose batten was held up by a cord attached to the front top rigging cable, and in the unstable state it changed from a convex curve to an S shape…)

After Scotkites repositioned the sail and fitted a stiffer nose batten, the docile flying characteristics of the Dove returned. (2)

For more about the problem of dive recovery in a weight shift controlled flying machine, see Luff in the time of cholera (a whole topic about the luffing dive) and Righteous stuff (look for the Sport Aviation Centurion) in Hang gliding early 1980s part 2.

See also the Electra Flyer of Albuquerque, New Mexico related topics menu.

Cyclone and Vortex

From the Chargus Cyclone advert in 1979
From the Chargus Cyclone advert in 1979

Chargus of Buckinghamshire, England, used a cross-tube rather than a bowsprit and cables despite the wide nose angle of the high performance Cyclone.


Chargus Vortex
From the Chargus Vortex advert in the British hang gliding magazine, April 1979

The Vortex intermediate level wing, which came in 110 degree and 120 degree nose angle variants, featured an array of small holes in the sail toward each wing-tip to improve its resistance to tip stalling. (The Cyclone might also have had similar holes.)

David Parsons flying a Chargus Vortex hang glider
David Parsons flying a Chargus Vortex

Technical: Notice the cable from the centre to the near wing tip. (The one the other side is hidden by the right down-tube.) These ‘bow strings’ limited the flex of the leading edges in the opposite way of the earlier deflexor systems — cables on struts along the leading edges. The hang strap has a pitch limiter, similar to that used on the Skyhook Cloud 9, but the Chargus version seems to be made of cable rather than webbing. (Webbing provides better resilience to shock loading.)

The pilot in the photo is David Parsons, Justin’s father, who died in 2019.

Author’s reminiscence: In 1979 I flight tested a Vortex that was reported to exhibit a turn. I flew it from a low hill and discovered that it did indeed tend to turn one way when flown ‘hands off’ (that is, by relaxing my grip on the control bar). In contrast, when I flared to land it, it dropped the opposite wing. It seemed likely to me that the bow strings needed adjusting. However, as was often the case in those days, I heard nothing more about it.

See also the Chargus of Buckinghamshire, England related topics menu.


This topic continues in Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 3.

External links

3 Decades of Liz by Liz Sharp as told to C.J. Sturtevant in Hang Gliding & Paragliding, May 2008

Grouse Mountain competition 1978: Names to Faces. The Challenge. Posted by Fred Wilson in 2014 on the Hanggliding.org forum, it attempts to identify the individuals in a group photo of about 70 top pilots from around the world. (Updated by this author in October 2020.)

1970s Found 8mm Film Home Movie – TORREY PINES HANG GLIDERS on YouTube starting at 1 minute 5 seconds, where George Worthington’s Cumulus VB with dragons painted on the sail appears; parked on the ground

References

1. My Life as a Hang Glider Maker by John LaTorre on his blog No truth to the rumor

2. Dove: Topic reply on British Hangies Facebook group

3. AeroStar Starcraft: Message from Cliff Whitney via this site’s contact form in May 2021

2 thoughts on “Hang gliding 1978 and 1979 part 2

    1. I have seen several photos of what appears to be the same glider, but it had a different name each time. The caption of that particular Bettina Gray photo called it the Eagle. Whatever it was called, it sure looked spectacular!

      Like

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